Rm 9 PENN: “Mana Wave” (#UpdaWahs)

This year, our school is all about making kindness contagious with the theme “Make Kindness Go Viral” (Wheoritia te atawhai). One cool way to spread some kindness is with a special greeting – the Mana Wave!

What’s a Mana Wave?

It’s a Māori twist on a friendly wave. Mana, in Māori, is a powerful word that means much more than just prestige or status. It’s about respect, strength, and a special kind of energy. So, a Mana Wave is more than just saying hi – it’s about sharing that positive energy with others.

Who started it?

Truck drivers in Aotearoa/New Zealand came up with the Mana Wave. They’d give a big, enthusiastic wave to other drivers and road crews they passed by. It’s a simple gesture that shows kindness and creates a sense of community.

So give it a try! A Mana Wave is a great way to show someone you care.

Have a tumeke holiday PES – Keep the Mana PES!
Kia Kaha! #UpdaWahs!

2023 Water safety & awareness swimming week

Our Year 5 students were fortunate to receive a week of free swimming lessons focused on water safety and awareness.  They had a fun and engaging learning experience, gaining valuable knowledge and skills to navigate  water safely.

Key learning outcomes from the lessons included:

Safe Entry and Exit: Students learned how to safely get in/out multiple ways, to test for depth, use slide entry, stride entry, and compact jump. They also learned safe exit techniques.

Submersion Comfort: Students got comfortable being submerged in water, controlled their breathing underwater, and performed simple tasks like retrieving objects from the pool floor. These skills enhance their underwater confidence and safety.

Personal Buoyancy: Students gained an understanding of how their body composition affects buoyancy and how to adjust their body positioning to float effectively in various positions. This knowledge is crucial for maintaining buoyancy and staying safe in different water depths.

Emergency Response: Students learned to recognise water emergencies, signal for help, and perform reach and throw rescues while prioritising their own safety. They also gained insights into assisting others in distress.

Overall, the swimming lessons empowered students with the knowledge and skills necessary to enjoy water activities safely and responsibly. By instilling water safety awareness, these lessons aim to prevent water-related accidents and promote lifelong aquatic enjoyment.

 

Reference:  waterskills

Farewell Coach Trey

 

Today we bid farewell to an exceptional Kiwisports Coach Tre. Over time, he became an integral part of our Pt England family, where he no longer needed introductions. He knew everyone’s names and quickly grasped their individual skill sets.

It has been remarkable to witness the growth in enjoyment, strength, and skills of our students, especially those who were initially less confident, under Coach Tre’s expert guidance. And to see our top athletes further develop their abilities and camaraderie with their peers.

As you embark on new endeavours, Coach Tre, know that you will be dearly missed. Please keep in touch!

Manamea Production

Recently, few of our PES staff attended an evening dance production called ‘Manamea’ (Samoan meaning of my ‘sweetheart’).

One of our former teacher support Roni Wright played the lead role of Sitione, who falls in love with Palepa.  However, both their families are involved in a long-standing land dispute.

Roni’s performance was truly exceptional – at Pt England, he’s typically the one behind the scenes, shinning the light for all students to be stars!  This resonated deeply with me, as we have students in our learning spaces who don’t always have a prominent voice, but with consistent support and encouragement, they have the potential to blossom into remarkable individuals.

Although our Pt England family missed your debut Roni, I know they would be cheering you on to see you flourish.

E felelei manu ae ma’au i o latou ofaga (Birds migrate to environments where they survive and thrive).

This proverb teaches us that adaptation is essential for survival and success. Just as birds must adapt to new environments, we too must be willing to adapt to new situations and challenges in order to achieve our goals.

Your journey is an inspiration to us – be open to new possibilities and to never give up on our dreams of greatness!

Thanks Roni – look forward to seeing more of your work on stage!

Manaiakalani Film Festival 2023 – A trip to Sylvia Park Movie theatre.

It’s time for the Manaiakalani Film Festival 2023!

Every year, schools from the Manaiakalani Cluster get to watch their short films on the big screen at Sylvia Park Hoyts. Our class was excited to attend this year’s film festival, as we produced two films – ‘ASMR 2.0’ and ‘What’s in the box?’.

For some of our students, it was their first time to walk through Sylvia Park Mall, let alone watching themselves and their peers on the big screen.

In our session, we only watched one of Room 9’s films – ‘What’s in the box?’. Our amazing film festival presenters Khai Shwe and Jaedha introduced our cool short film. You couldn’t even tell they were nervous.

Our other class presenters Eziaz and Hinerangi didn’t sit in this session, as they presented our class film in another theater. But the whole experience was amazing – we want to say a huge ‘Thank you’ to Manaiakalani Trust for organizing and making this event happen.

2023 Manaiakalani Film Festival – ASMR 2.0

Kia ora! Welcome to our ASMR movie!

Join us on a magical journey to a dream world
filled with delicious, crunchy sounds … including the peasant pear.

ASMR is perfect for relaxing and de-stressing,

(whisper) so sit back, relax, and enjoy the show!

Nga Mihi Nui!

2023 Manaiakalani Film Festival – “What’s in the box?”

Jaedha and Shwe Shwe’s “What’s in the box?” challenge had the students of Room 9 buzzing with excitement.  They had to use their sense of touch to identify the mystery object inside the box, but it proved to be more difficult than they expected.

Watch Room 9’s “What’s in the box?” short to find out what it was!

Creating a Wharenui through tinkercad

Our reading group read a text called ‘Building a Wharenui’ by Dougal Austin. It was full of interesting facts, such as:

  • The kaikaranga (welcome ceremony) is performed at the front of the wharenui.
  • The wharenui represents an ancestor.
  • Each part of the wharenui represents important aspects of tangata whenua culture

 

We examined the design thinking process behind building a wharenui through an inquiry lens. We learned that whakairo (carving) begins 3-10 years before construction, and that no nails are used; instead, rope and wood hold the wharenui together.

Check out Ofili’s design of the wharenui (created in Tinkercad) and his recording of the building process in iMovie.

http://Ofili’s blog
Task Description:Today i created my WhareNui by using a website called Tinker Cad i had to make a WhareNui,by using all the different objects and features.

Rm 9 PENN ‘A Time with friends’…

Before our writing test, Room 9 and 10 had a challenge – to design couture attire using toilet paper in groups of 3-4 friends. We had 8 minutes to create this wearable art.  The outcome was both hilarious and stressful.

Our class had a great time collaborating, using their creativity, communicating with each other, and critically evaluating their designer dresses.  Check out our PENN

Keeping ourselves Safe – No excuse for Abuse

We had our 2nd visit from Constable Gordon to talk about different forms of harm.  This was a valuable experience for students. It is important for learners to know about harm so that they can identify and avoid harmful situations.

The activity that Constable Gordon facilitated, was explaining different forms of harm and their rights.  He went through different forms of harm (they labelled and blue-tacked around the room, on the wall) used various of case scenarios, then the students had to stand beside the headings (classified forms of hard).  This activity was thought-provoking for students, as they had to discuss why they stood under that form of harm.  This was a great way of critical thinking to develop a better understanding of harm.

I had some interesting feedback from students about this activity.  A few students were uncomfortable with some of the terminology that was used.  A few students were able to describe some of the forms of harm that they have been exposed to and we talked what their next steps would be.  A few students asked if Constable Gordon will be returning for further learning.

Here are some questions that could be asked for our students to reflect on the activity:

What was the most challenging part of the activity?
What did you learn about yourself and others from this activity?
How can you use what you learned in this activity to help yourself and others?
I believe that it is important to have open and honest conversations with students about harm. By talking about it, we can help to break down the stigma and make it easier for students to seek help if they need it.

Having these open and honest korero/talanoa with students about harm, allows them to break down the stigma and make it easier for students to seek help if they need it.

Link to the lesson plan